A Weekend on the Farm

15046971_360599807625538_5380224919458021376_n

It finally happened.  The stars aligned, Michael’s managers had seen my haggard face at the brewery and thought that something must be done, and we got an entire weekend off together.  Most couples might take for granted that they have weekends off together, but between our varying work schedules, we had not had a single day off at home together in over 4 months.  It was amazing.

img_7438-1

We started off our morning with lattes and solving the world’s problemsimg_7480

Let the chickens out to roam around
img_7493

Fed Dory her bottle.  (Is there really a more precious sight than a handsome man bottle feeding a baby goat? No.)img_7539

Then we hung out with the goats.  We call Ginger our “Stoner Goat” as she is the most laid back but also the most food-motivated.  Today though, she was especially slow moving.   We saw her lift her tail and start to poop, but this was no normal poop. img_7601

Knowing that we had been having problems with scours in our baby goat and that you had to catch a stool sample before it touched the ground, I did what any crazy goat lady would do.  I grabbed a leaf and caught the poo.img_7604

You can clearly seem my mixed emotions of amusement/horror at what I had just done.  Another one of those moments where I question, what am I doing with my life?img_7618

Folly and Jackson love helping dad bring the food to the pigsimg_7623

We are in desperate need of rain up here, you can tell by how dusty the pig area has gotten. Unfortunately this has been contributing to the situation with the wildfires that are still burning in our area.
img_7613

We are currently playing with a 3 day pig slop fermentation system that is being supplemented with corn and food waste.  Our basement looks like something that would belong to a mad scientist with different buckets bubbling at different rates in every corner.img_7668

A worried Michael drives to the vet to get the stool sample tested.  The vet said their was no sign of parasites or anything else that could be causing the upset.  We have decided to switch to a less rich hay in hopes that it helps out their little bellies.img_7674

A quick trip to the library yielded great results!  My favorite time of the day is when we eat our fresh scrambled eggs, sip lattes, and flip through books discussing with each other what we glean.  It is the most relaxing and calming part of the day.

img_7293

We had something try to break into our chicken coop over night (no chickens were injured) so we threw some “finishing touches” on our redneck chicken coop and started to chase down the chickens.  In order for chickens to recognize a coop as “home” where they will return every night, you leave the chickens locked up for a few days.  img_7748

Michael is a natural and fearless chicken wrangler,

img_7753

I moved a little more slowly and mine escaped.img_7792

We ended the day by trying to socialize our fearful goats  with grain (Read about how we got these skittish cuties here.)img_7800

Look at Hazel’s cute tongue! It was a great weekend on the farm and an amazing day of getting to see my fiance during daylight hours.

One thought on “A Weekend on the Farm

  • You should read “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” by Barbara Kingsolver. She and her family tried to live for a year almost exclusively on what they could raise on their small plot.
    I’m looking forward to future blogs. I’m Jeremy Allen’s mom.

Leave a Reply